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3 colonies 3 polls: no change, hobbits unhappy

Scotland

No t Ye t
The UK probably only offered the independence option because they thought it would not  be taken up but once international market began to get nervous the hype machine had to get into overdrive to push it back in the box.It would be fair to say neither Scotland nor the UK were completely prepared for Scotland to leave with Scotland holding the oil assets and the (war) ship building, and the UK holding the currency, the pension funds and the national health service (NHS). Sort of like winning the lottery and thinking of leaving your wife only to find out she gets half of everything anyway, and the kids aren’t ready to leave home either.

On the positive side: more powers of self rule were offered in order to sway the vote back to the ‘no independence’ camp where it had looked dangerously lacking.
scotland2014 vote

Fiji
Colonel Frank Bainimarama
First election in 8 years Colonel B retains leadership but a veneer of democracy restored, but for how long?

Positive side 8 years and no coup.

FL31FIJI-COUP_1456336g

New Zealand

Despite mounting evidence of deep corruption in New Zealand political system  New Zealand returned a largely unchanged parliament,
and returned John Key formerly of the Federal Reserve Bank of the USA as its leader. The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.

Positive side: all the international based shills will now pull up stakes and fade out of the picture.

Negative side: Hone Harawira, a strong campaigner for the poor, appears to have lost his place in parliament.

New Zealand election 2014

New Zealand election 2014

 

 

And now we get to hear about all the ‘irregularities’ in these polls, will be very interesting.

 

Fun fact: all of the places discussed were or currently are controlled by the UK in some way.

Kurdistan begins independent oil sales

Kurdistan begin selling oil to Turkey, but not via Iraq.

Kurdistan begin selling oil to Turkey, but not via Iraq.

The firs steps towards a new middle eastern nation are being taken today, with Kurdistan beginning sales of oil to Turkey. The Turks have been paying quite high prices for oil lately, so there is at least one satisfied customer but the economic price is just one part of the cost to consider. Iraq is clearly not happy as they feel it is their oil.  Kurds might argue Iraq only ever existed (and was created) so that the British could get control of oil and have it delivered to the port of Basra.

The geopolitics of oil now have  new factor in the complex equations of diplomacy. If Turkey Joins the EU there will be an oil state on the doorstep of the EU. Could a pipeline from Iran to Europe now be more feasible. Will Kurdish people flood to the newly cemented state?

Just like a new service station opening up in your town or city there are always flow on effect. Everything in the Middle east just got a little more interesting.

Good Luck to the Kurdish people.

Admin Addition:

Where is Kurdistan?

Kurdistan-Map-with-Kirkuk photo1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kurds already control a region in Northern Iraq, but may want significant parts of Turkey, part of the border region of Iran and even some of Syria and Armenia.

With access to the oil trade some of these wishes may be fulfilled, but  like any transaction is there a willing seller, and what will be the price?

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