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Australian Geopolitical mindset



This video might help make Australia’s involvement is wars make more sense. It shows we need to be allied with  a powerful navy to be able to trade internationally. If one looks a bit deeper,into the fact all of Australia’s petroleum fuel products are refined in Singapore it explains why the Australian government is is so reluctant to say anything to upset Indonesia, our northern neighbor who has the worlds fifth largest navy and 100 Million Muslims. It’s terror attack by a Muslim demanding an ISIS flag claiming to be part of ISIS but the Australian government says its nothing to do with Islam, because we can’t upset the people between us and our oil.

Saw the video here:

but didn’t want reblog fail.

Scott Bennett US Psyops whistleblower

In this radio interview from May 2015 Scott Bennett accurately predicts the flood of Syrian migrants to the EU.

He also explains his view on US geopolitics and foreign policy in relation to oil and the middle east.

In true whistle-blower fashion  he has been imprisoned  on trivial charges relating to a housing application.


Scott Bennett has a website;

which include this reference.

 In Mel Gibson’s masterpiece film “Braveheart”, there is a scene  where the “nobleman” who betrayed William Wallace on the battlefield—abandoning him during the fight in favor of bribe money and political title—is asleep in his subsidized bed, tossing-and-turning as he’s tormented by the nightmare of a blue-face-painted, sword-swinging Wallace galloping on horseback against a backdrop of flames, chasing after him; startling him awake with terror. 

As he whimpers relieved that it was just a dream,  the bedchamber doors suddenly burst open with Wallace atop a black horse, as he rides in, steps onto the bed, unfurls a massive iron ball-and-chain, and swirls and smashes it down up on the face of the traitor.

I anticipate this report will no doubt have the same effect on certain people.  For right now somewhere, in the dark, dank cubicles of U.S. Government, there is a nervously twitching cabal of parasitic lawyers and bureaucrats from the White  House, the Intelligence Community, Congress, the media, and the military, who have been dreading and desperately trying to bury and stop this report form ever reaching the American public.  Obstructionists, whose skulduggery must now, with the weight and momentum behind these documents, come to a career-face smashing end; and their deeds are exposed as the acts of treason they are.



Syria,Kurdistan, ISIS, Oil, Pipelines, BRICS and geopolititcs




Some very interesting geopolitical analysis ( treating the world as a chess board) relating to OIL, the middle east and the interested parties.

It hardly looks all that significant , but your quality of life literally flows through this steel pipe. Who controls these pipes ane where they are built or destroyed are what most wars in the last 100 years have been about.

It hardly looks all that significant, but your quality of life literally flows through this steel pipe. Who controls these pipes and where they are built or destroyed, is what most wars in the last 100 years have been about.


Here is a useful map to help you understand current and potential future political borders in the middle east.


The Ukrainian upheaval: Some geopolitical perspectives

The Ukraine is becoming a complex and fast moving conflict with multiple factions having multiple agendas.

For the latest updates:

It seems that this conflict started as a proxy war between Russia/CIS  vs  EU/US, but additional home-grown factions soon saw their chance to enter the power vacuum. The Crimea has talked of independence so what you have is at least four factions.

Some might argue Russia is simply suffering from a bruised ego, but the conflict goes deeper than this. The former USSR states are attempting to for a new USSR called the CIS, a copy of the EU incorporating many of the former USSR states.  You might be wondering why Ukraine is so important to Russia and the CIS in this plan. The answer is of course petrochemicals, not oil per se this time, but rather gas pipelines.

The Gas


The Ukraine is strategically important have the majority of Russian gas pipelines to Europe, Without the Ukraine Russia has only one pipeline going  through  Belarus to deliver is gas to Europe. Giving Belarus a monopoly on gas delivery to Europe would make Belarus far too powerful for Russia’s liking, and far too powerful in a proposed CIS.


Russia is of course building other pipe lines to be less dependent on the Ukraine and Belarus, but these are massive projects and take significant time and resources to complete.


The gas deals are of course very controversial, Yukanovych and Tymoshenko were both implicated in dirty deals and skimming money off gas deals with Russia, and most recently (2010) the controversial Ukrainian decision to allow Russian to keep its black sea fleet in port of Sevastapol, on the Crimean peninsula until 2042.

The Crimea

Crimea has wanted Independence from both Russia and the Ukraine for at least a decade. The Crimean Economy is largely based on the two navies stationed there, (the Ukrainian and Russian) the industries that support the Navies.  Tourism Is economically significant being a temperate ( and Russian speaking)  beach side resort for many people of the CIS. The Crimean does not want to risk bad relations with Russia and the CIS, as the tourism money would disappear.

While Russia has other land that borders the Black sea, they have had their navy stationed In Sevastopol since 1783, briefly forced out by the Germans in WW2, so naturally feel they belong there. Sevastapol is part of the Ukraine so the Ukrainian navy feel it should belong there. As a deep water port the Crimean has some interesting advantages, because of its island/peninsula arrangement the Navy can quite easily surround and defend its port from land based attack, This makes it a natural stronghold, not something any navy would want to give up. The black sea flows through the Dardanelles past Gallipoli (which we all should know about) into the Mediterranean (of importance to the EU) and then to the rest of the world’s oceans.

This of course leads to somewhat strange situation of two navies both being stationed in the same place, almost a naval cold war.

So what this is about is the politics of the middle man.

For the Gas pipelines Ukraine and particularly Kiev are able to set the price (and quantity) of Russian gas entering the EU. Controlling this flow of energy and money between two powerful economic blocs makes for significant political power and significant risk of corruption.

For whoever controls the Crimea and Sevastopol controls the black sea and its ability to deploy naval and military force in the region. Controlling a geopolitically significant deep water seaport is an extremely powerful tool in diplomacy. Russia wants to build a gas pipeline under the black sea so will need to control the black sea to assure the project and hardly want the additional expense of building a new naval port as well.

An independent Crimea would be unlikely to create a naval fleet of its own and would likely take the highest bid to station any interested party, which could be almost anyone, Turkey, US, EU, Iran… This could become a geopolitical lottery, or just Russian Roulette.

It’s not easy being an honest middle man.

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